Cedric Tai

Somewhere in this website...

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Ross Sinclair
A video still/production shot from Ross & the Realifers: Glasgow vs. Detroit (Band) 2015

''Over Over Over''

Artist-Curator Cedric Tai invited five Glasgow-based artists, Tessa Lynch, Francis McKee, John Nicol, Rosie O'Grady, and Ross Sinclair, to Detroit for an exhibition that investigates what it means to be an artist, creating and sustaining their practices in these cities.

This project is rooted in Tai's introduction to the artistic community of Glasgow, which he saw as having similarities to Detroit's developing art scene. Glasgow could serve as an ideal model for artists to re-imagine Detroit's potential. He worked to learn as much as possible by attending meetings of grassroots organizations (such as GalGael), being a part of the AHRC funded project "The Glasgow Miracle: Materials for Alternative Histories" and leading walking tours through the city of Glasgow. Through these actions he met the five artists in this exhibition, as co-workers, peers and collaborators.

Drive Drumming

On-going project...

John Nicol and Cedric Tai

''Indirectly Yours''

This exhibition attempted to subvert the model of the solo show by handing off the installation process to artist John Nicol. In a way, I asked John to create two solo shows that would be represented in a single space. The exhibition further challenged the idea of authorship by featuring paintings created out of other artists' used painting palettes.

Part of the meaning behind this arrangement was the recent change in UK visa laws which made it difficult for recent foreign graduates to stay in the country, putting a strain on artists ability to work on long term projects with one another. I believe that this will have negative ramifications on Glasgow's culture and art scene which prides itself on attracting and retaining international artists.

Moroccan Tile

''Go on Vacation, Rearrange the Furniture''

During my MFA degree show opening at the Glasgow School of Art, I secretly planted small works of art on unsuspecting visitors. Using the artwork composed of tile arrangements to keep their attention, myself and a team of trained volunteers planted small tile pieces on visitors through a process I call reverse pick-pocketing.

''Equilibrium'' - Performed at Jim Lambie's Poetry Club

The work initially began as a challenge between myself and the composer, Thom Norman, to create a new language in our current practice. We found common ground in our interest of the distance between work as it is planned or written, what happens, and what it becomes after it is recorded and disseminated. I was interested in taking the idea of 'recording the music' to an absurd level by conjuring up a contraption similar to a 'Rube Goldberg' or 'Heath Robinson' setup while still representing the music as a moment within a flow.